Journal article

Is This Professor Māori? Personal reflections on identity in academia in Aotearoa New Zealand

Submitted by csmi500 on Tue, 06/29/2021 - 12:46
Article type
Author(s)
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2021.10.1.7

This article has been inspired by “Why Isn’t My Professor Māori?” (McAllister et al., 2019), an article which appeared in this journal and addressed the under-representation of, and inequities facing, Māori academic staff in universities in Aotearoa New Zealand. I present some personal reflections and raise some questions with regard to academics with Māori heritage but who struggle to identify as Māori.

Calling forth our pasts, citing our futures: an envisioning of a Kaupapa Māori citational practice

Submitted by csmi500 on Tue, 06/29/2021 - 12:12
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2021.10.1.8

This paper explores how we, three wāhine Māori, are moving through citational practice—who, how, and why we cite. Stemming from a refusal to recirculate settler colonial ideologies in doctoral research, we consider what it means to cite as Māori. In centring whakapapa, we conceptualise citations as extensions of our relational world and as a way we can acknowledge and nurture the intergenerational relationships that constitute who we are, and how we come to know. Citation is an expression of whanaungatanga.

He Piki Raukura: Understanding Strengths-based Māori child development constructs in Kaupapa Māori early years provision

Submitted by csmi500 on Tue, 06/29/2021 - 11:40
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2021.10.1.2

The importance of early childhood education programmes has been widely established by researchers, but there has been little research on the outcomes of early childhood Kaupapa Māori educational initiatives in Aotearoa New Zealand. The aim of the research project reported here, He Piki Raukura, was to define Māori child behaviour constructs that may underlie positive Māori child development. We conducted in-depth interviews with two experts and 21 whānau participating in a Kaupapa Māori early years programme in Taranaki.

Tangi te Kawekaweā: Whānau engagement in Kaupapa Māori Early Years Provision-an exploratory qualitative study

Submitted by csmi500 on Tue, 06/29/2021 - 10:00
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2021.10.1.1

Kaupapa Māori early years provision (KM-EYP) is often understood as a critical site for Māori cultural revitalisation, where a foundation for the educational success and lifelong wellbeing of tamariki Māori is laid. Given its importance, the Tangi te Kawekaweā study sought to identify and examine barriers and facilitators of whānau engagement in KM-EYP. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with individual whānau members (n = 19) and whānau groups (n = 5) enrolled in one centre for KM-EYP, and with expert informants (n = 10). This paper reports on the insights gained.

SURVIVANCE AS NARRATIVE IDENTITY: Voices from a Ngāti Tiipa oral history project

Submitted by csmi500 on Tue, 03/30/2021 - 08:51
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2020.9.3.11

For Indigenous peoples, and Māori specifically, storytelling and oral history are crucial to the survival of our collective identities, culture and language. Retold across generations, our stories are often explicit and interwoven narratives of personal and collective memories. Drawing on Native American scholar Gerald Vizenor’s (2009) concept of “survivance stories”, this article explores a set of three oral history narratives of kaumātua from Ngāti Tiipa, one of the 33 iwi and hapū of the Waikato-Tainui confederation.

Voices from a Ngāti Tiipa oral history project

Submitted by csmi500 on Tue, 12/15/2020 - 12:19
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2020.9.3.11

For Indigenous peoples, and Māori specifically, storytelling and oral history are crucial to the survival of our collective identities, culture and language. Retold across generations, our stories are often explicit and interwoven narratives of personal and collective memories. Drawing on Native American scholar Gerald Vizenor’s (2009) concept of “survivance stories”, this article explores a set of three oral history narratives of kaumātua from Ngāti Tiipa, one of the 33 iwi and hapū of the Waikato-Tainui confederation.

KĀRE Ā-TINANA, ENGARI, Ā-WAIRUA: TE MANA O TE KARERE: Re-thinking Indigenous postgraduate whanaungatanga

Submitted by csmi500 on Mon, 12/14/2020 - 13:46
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2020.9.4.6

The COVID-19 pandemic and resulting lockdowns in Aotearoa New Zealand have been a source of change, of uncertainty and of anxiety. The ways in which we engage with each other as Indigenous people have had to change drastically and suddenly; our ways of being, of sharing space, of being present, have all had to be adjusted. For Indigenous postgraduate students, COVID-19 and lockdowns have meant a re-shaping and re-thinking of how we come together as a community that supports each other within Westernised institutions and along our academic and research journeys.

FROM EXPLOITATIVE TO REGENERATIVE TOURISM: Tino rangatiratanga and tourism in Aotearoa New Zealand

Submitted by csmi500 on Mon, 12/14/2020 - 09:57
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2020.9.3.10

Aotearoa New Zealand’s environmental management has long been considered short-sighted and focused on economic development over environmental, cultural or social imperatives. Tourism contributes to those pressures on our environments and communities. While Māori have always been involved in tourism, there is a concerted movement by many Māori towards engagement with tourism as a means of reconnecting with cultural traditions, protecting natural resources and providing employment for whānau.

STUDENT VOICE: Learning paangarau in a Maaori-medium modern learning environment

Submitted by csmi500 on Mon, 12/14/2020 - 09:36
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2020.9.3.9

Maaori-medium educators are deeply committed to the revitalisation of tikanga and te reo Maaori in order to enhance the cultural setting in which aakonga learn and kaiako teach. This article originates from a project which set out to explore the teaching, learning and achievement in paangarau of learners in a Maaori- medium puna maatauranga kiritoa/modern learning environment (PMK/MLE) located in a small town in Aotearoa New Zealand. In this two- year study, a total of 106 year 4–6 aakonga were supported to consider the teaching and learning of paangarau in their PMK.