Reremoana Theodore

He Piki Raukura: Understanding Strengths-based Māori child development constructs in Kaupapa Māori early years provision

Submitted by csmi500 on Tue, 06/29/2021 - 11:40
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2021.10.1.2

The importance of early childhood education programmes has been widely established by researchers, but there has been little research on the outcomes of early childhood Kaupapa Māori educational initiatives in Aotearoa New Zealand. The aim of the research project reported here, He Piki Raukura, was to define Māori child behaviour constructs that may underlie positive Māori child development. We conducted in-depth interviews with two experts and 21 whānau participating in a Kaupapa Māori early years programme in Taranaki.

Tangi te Kawekaweā: Whānau engagement in Kaupapa Māori Early Years Provision-an exploratory qualitative study

Submitted by csmi500 on Tue, 06/29/2021 - 10:00
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2021.10.1.1

Kaupapa Māori early years provision (KM-EYP) is often understood as a critical site for Māori cultural revitalisation, where a foundation for the educational success and lifelong wellbeing of tamariki Māori is laid. Given its importance, the Tangi te Kawekaweā study sought to identify and examine barriers and facilitators of whānau engagement in KM-EYP. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with individual whānau members (n = 19) and whānau groups (n = 5) enrolled in one centre for KM-EYP, and with expert informants (n = 10). This paper reports on the insights gained.

GLASS CEILINGS IN NEW ZEALAND UNIVERSITIES: Inequities in Māori and Pacific promotions and earnings

Submitted by csmi500 on Mon, 11/30/2020 - 09:36
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2020.9.3.8

Māori and Pacific academics make up less than 4% and 1% respectively of New Zealand professors. We investigated ethnic inequities in promotions and earnings in New Zealand universities. Using New Zealand’s Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF) data (2003, 2012, 2018) we found that Māori and Pacific men and also women academics, compared with non-Māori non-Pacific men academics, had significantly lower odds of being an associate professor or professor (professoriate) or of being promoted, and had lower earnings.

Te kura mai i tawhiti research programme: A collaborative lifecourse approach to health, wellbeing and whānau development

Submitted by csmi500 on Tue, 03/05/2019 - 11:46
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2019.8.1.5

Lifecourse research examines people’s trajectories through life and factors that influence those trajectories. It has the potential to build an evidence base around programmes that are effective for Māori. This paper describes the development and initial stages of Te Kura Mai i Tawhiti (TKMT), an innovative long-term research programme run as a collaboration between Taranaki Māori community organisation Te Pou Tiringa and the University of Otago’s National Centre for Lifecourse Research.