MAI Journal 2020: Volume 9 Issue 2

Publication Date
Articles in this issue

Rights and resurgence in Aotearoa New Zealand: A case study

Submitted by csmi500 on Wed, 07/29/2020 - 12:47
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DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2019.9.2.1

The 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (the Declaration) has gained increasing attention as a tool for promoting Indigenous rights. The study reported in this article contributes to the discussion about the Declaration’s effectiveness by analysing its role in advancing Indigenous peoples’ self-determination. A qualitative case study was conducted between January and February 2018 with 18 Māori activists in Aotearoa New Zealand, using a rights-based and Indigenous-based approach to form the analytical framework.

Te Takarangi: The Significance of curating a sample list of Māori authorised non-fiction books

Submitted by csmi500 on Wed, 07/29/2020 - 12:49
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DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2019.9.2.2

In 2018, we curated the Te Takarangi Book List: a collection of 150 Māori-authored non-fiction books. The list profiles some of the important Māori leaders, thinkers and authors of our time. From the first book published about the Māori language in 1815 to the works of current Māori scholars, researchers and writers making their mark and claiming a voice in the research environment of Aotearoa New Zealand, this is a sample list to celebrate.

The impact on whānau wellbeing: transferring to secondary or tertiary hospitals

Submitted by csmi500 on Wed, 07/29/2020 - 12:52
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10.20507/MAIJournal.2019.9.2.3

This article explores the impact on whānau wellbeing following wāhine being transferred to either secondary or tertiary care hospitals to receive health care for themselves or their baby during the birthing journey. It was found that throughout this process, the wāhine and whānau faced a series of challenges that compromised their wellbeing. Feeling isolated from their home, support networks and baby, and not fulfilling their motherhood expectations were major challenges.

Te Hihiri: A process of coming to know

Submitted by csmi500 on Wed, 07/29/2020 - 12:53
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10.20507/MAIJournal.2019.9.2.4

Indigenous wisdom traditions regard knowledge as an active and creative process of coming to know. Descriptions of the emergence of knowledge are found in cosmological whakapapa narratives, which reflect and inform an Indigenous worldview. Outlined in this article is an Indigenous Māori research paradigm that is underpinned by the cosmological whakapapa and describes knowledge creation as a relationship with experience.

Provocation: Discouraging children from speaking te reo in schools as a strategic Māori initiative

Submitted by csmi500 on Mon, 08/24/2020 - 15:46
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10.20507/MAIJournal.2019.9.2.5

This article is written as a provocation. By re-examining the practice of discouraging children from speaking te reo Māori in schools, we challenge our students and other researchers to be alert to the ways in which Māori are often positioned in critical research. Many otherwise radical accounts that focus on Māori assimilation into a Western social order unwittingly take a coloniser-centric approach, inevitably representing Māori as passive non-agents.

The long shadow of inequity for Māori with gout

Submitted by csmi500 on Thu, 09/03/2020 - 10:33
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DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2019.9.2.6

Gout is a health condition that can be managed to prevent morbidity and premature mortality. Māori have a higher prevalence of gout yet are less likely to receive appropriate care than non-Māori. There is scant literature presenting the patient/whānau voice relating to the health system response to gout. The study reported in this article aimed to highlight barriers and enablers in achieving best practice management of gout as defined by patients in order to inform the development of appropriate pathways and services.

Whānau, Tikanga and Tino Rangatiratanga: What is at stake in the debate over the Ministry for Children?

Submitted by csmi500 on Thu, 09/03/2020 - 10:35
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10.20507/MAIJournal.2019.9.2.7

The removal of a Māori child in May 2019 led to widespread protest and the launch of four inquiries into the Ministry for Children, plus an urgent inquiry through the Waitangi Tribunal. Tamariki Māori are over-represented in the child welfare system, but the issues are not just about the system itself. The legacy of colonisation continues to have an impact, not just on individual whānau, but also on the loss of tikanga in relation to whānau. It is the tikanga of whānau that many protesters seek to protect.

Body Sovereignty and Te Matatini

Submitted by csmi500 on Thu, 09/03/2020 - 10:37
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10.20507/MAIJournal.2019.9.2.8

This commentary explores the ways in which body sovereignty has been illustrated and supported in the sovereign space of Te Matatini (Ki Te Ao). It is suggested that the 2019 Te Matatini Ki Te Ao Kapa Haka Finals were a space that privileged Te Ao Māori and body sovereignty in multiple, intersecting ways. I propose that sovereign spaces such as Te Matatini provide an alternative illustration, discourse and narrative to current coloniality that restricts, limits and does not acknowledge body sovereignty.

The lead article by Sierra Hampton, Rights and resurgence in Aotearoa New Zealand: A case study of the united nations declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples role in self determination contributes to the discussion about the Declaration’s effectiveness by analysing its role in advancing Indigenous peoples’ self-determination. This article provides new scholarship on how and why Indigenous activists utilise rights-based and Indigenous-based approaches, finding that no single approach or advocacy method is used alone and that Māori deftly combine the Declaration with Indigenous methods of activism to enhance their self-determination.

The second article in this issue by Jacinta Ruru, Jeanette Wikaira and Angela Wanhalla is titled Te Takarangi: The Significance of curating a sample list of Māori authorised non-fiction books. This article details how we curated this special book list and highlights some of the undeniable themes that emerge when a mass of books are purposely brought to sit together.

The third article in this issue by Kendall Stevenson, Fiona Cram, Sara Filoche, and Beverley Lawtontitled The impact on whānau wellbeing: transferring to secondary or tertiary hospitals following a disruption to the birthing journey explores the impact on whānau wellbeing following wāhine being transferred to either secondary or tertiary care hospitals to receive health care for themselves or their baby during the birthing journey

The next paper in our second issue for 2020 is titled Te Hihiri: A process of coming to know This paper was written by Amber Nicholson and outlines an Indigenous Māori research paradigm that is underpinned by the cosmological whakapapa and describes knowledge creation as a relationship with experience. A Māori methodological framework, Te Hihiri process, is offered as a research tool to keep researchers grounded in Indigenous wisdom, guided by ancestral knowledge and entrenched in spirit.

The fifth article in this issue is authored by Te Kawehau Hoskins, Kimai Tocker and Alison Jones. The title is Provocation: Discouraging children from speaking te reo in schools as a strategic Māori initiative. This article is written as a provocation. We ask: Whose actions and motivations are given most attention in our critiques of Māori experiences? And how are Māori positioned in our writing as a result? It is argued that a Māori-centred narrative focuses on Māori as agents, and gives attention to progressive Māori educational thought, and Māori relationality, strategy, determination and survival.

The next article is co-authored by Leanne Te Karu, Timothy Kenealy, Linda Bryant, Bruce Arroll, Matire Harwood and is titled The long shadow of inequity for Māori with gout. This article aims to highlight barriers and enablers in achieving best practice management of gout as defined by patients in order to inform the development of appropriate pathways and services

The last two pieces in this issue are commentaries. The first is titled Whānau, Tikanga and Tino Rangatiratanga: What is at stake in the debate over the Ministry for Children? and is written by Luke Fitzmaurice. This commentary explores issues relating to the Ministry of Children and the child welfare system within current contexts, where child welfare issues are a matter of considerable public debate.

Our final piece by Ashlea Gillon, Body Sovereignty and Te Matatini explores the ways in which body sovereignty has been illustrated and supported in the sovereign space of Te Matatini (Ki Te Ao). The author proposes that sovereign spaces such as Te Matatini provide an alternative illustration, discourse and narrative to current coloniality that restricts, limits and does not acknowledge body sovereignty.