Pacific

GLASS CEILINGS IN NEW ZEALAND UNIVERSITIES: Inequities in Māori and Pacific promotions and earnings

Submitted by csmi500 on Mon, 11/30/2020 - 09:36
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2020.9.3.8

Māori and Pacific academics make up less than 4% and 1% respectively of New Zealand professors. We investigated ethnic inequities in promotions and earnings in New Zealand universities. Using New Zealand’s Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF) data (2003, 2012, 2018) we found that Māori and Pacific men and also women academics, compared with non-Māori non-Pacific men academics, had significantly lower odds of being an associate professor or professor (professoriate) or of being promoted, and had lower earnings.

Lalanga ha kaha’u monu’ia–Helping science educators to embed Indigenous knowledge, values and cultures in courses

Submitted by csmi500 on Tue, 06/09/2020 - 11:58
Article type
Author(s)
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2020.9.1.6

Māori and Pacific students are not achieving in science in comparison with other ethnic groups in Aotearoa New Zealand. At the same time, evidence of engagement with their traditional ways of knowing and being in university science settings is limited. Most formal science curricula globally are founded on Western modern science, and this focus can contribute to the underachievement of Indigenous students in science, particularly if Indigenous knowledge is not included (Howlett et al., 2008).

Why isn’t my professor Pasifika? A snapshot of the academic workforce in New Zealand universities

Submitted by csmi500 on Tue, 08/27/2019 - 16:23
Article type
Author(s)
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2019.8.2.9

This paper examines the ethnicity of academic scholars employed by New Zealand’s eight universities, with a particular focus on Pasifika academics. The paper discusses how, despite national and university policies to see education serve Pasifika peoples better, there has been no change in the numbers of Pasifika academics employed by the universities between 2012 and 2017, and notes that Pasifika who are in the academy are continually employed in the lower, less secure levels of the academy.

A Māori and Pacific lens on infant and toddler provision in early childhood education

Submitted by bgol013 on Mon, 11/30/2015 - 14:41
Article type

This article presents the findings from a 2014 nationwide online survey conducted with Māori and Pacific teachers working in Māori and Pacific early childhood services and language nests. The paper emphasizes that key to educational success for Māori and Pasifika children is the acknowledgement that they are culturally located and the recognition that effective education must embrace culture.