FROM EXPLOITATIVE TO REGENERATIVE TOURISM: Tino rangatiratanga and tourism in Aotearoa New Zealand

Submitted by csmi500 on Mon, 12/14/2020 - 09:57
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2020.9.3.10

Aotearoa New Zealand’s environmental management has long been considered short-sighted and focused on economic development over environmental, cultural or social imperatives. Tourism contributes to those pressures on our environments and communities. While Māori have always been involved in tourism, there is a concerted movement by many Māori towards engagement with tourism as a means of reconnecting with cultural traditions, protecting natural resources and providing employment for whānau.

STUDENT VOICE: Learning paangarau in a Maaori-medium modern learning environment

Submitted by csmi500 on Mon, 12/14/2020 - 09:36
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2020.9.3.9

Maaori-medium educators are deeply committed to the revitalisation of tikanga and te reo Maaori in order to enhance the cultural setting in which aakonga learn and kaiako teach. This article originates from a project which set out to explore the teaching, learning and achievement in paangarau of learners in a Maaori- medium puna maatauranga kiritoa/modern learning environment (PMK/MLE) located in a small town in Aotearoa New Zealand. In this two- year study, a total of 106 year 4–6 aakonga were supported to consider the teaching and learning of paangarau in their PMK.

GLASS CEILINGS IN NEW ZEALAND UNIVERSITIES: Inequities in Māori and Pacific promotions and earnings

Submitted by csmi500 on Mon, 11/30/2020 - 09:36
Article type
DOI
10.20507/MAIJournal.2020.9.3.8

Māori and Pacific academics make up less than 4% and 1% respectively of New Zealand professors. We investigated ethnic inequities in promotions and earnings in New Zealand universities. Using New Zealand’s Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF) data (2003, 2012, 2018) we found that Māori and Pacific men and also women academics, compared with non-Māori non-Pacific men academics, had significantly lower odds of being an associate professor or professor (professoriate) or of being promoted, and had lower earnings.